Best Universities For Social Work

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Best Universities For Social Work – The MPPWCC survey consists of approximately 60 items, organized into 10 main sections. For example, one section extracts contact information on a survey respondent and identifies information about their respective institution (eg, review, minority serving institution [MSI] status). The next section contains several items to assess the structural diversity of the institution and relevant departments in terms of gender, race, sexual orientation, and disability. There are several sections that measure the availability and extent of support services provided to staff in university communities, such as professional development.

The survey was prepared by Dr. Terrell Strayhorn and is not publicly available. The original survey was pilot tested on a small sample of institutions; feedback from the pilot study helped to clarify the survey items, correct the logical sequence, and determine the usefulness of the scoring algorithm. All rights to the survey belong to the author. All analyzes presented in this issue were performed by Terrell Strayhorn and Royel Johnson.

Best Universities For Social Work

Best Universities For Social Work

The Most Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges (MPPWCC) survey consists of approximately 60 items, organized into 10 main sections. For example, one section extracts contact information on a survey respondent and identifies information about their respective institution (eg, review, minority serving institution [MSI] status). The next section contains several items to assess the structural diversity of the institution and relevant departments in terms of gender, race, sexual orientation, and disability. There are several sections that measure the availability and extent of support services provided to staff in university communities, such as professional development.

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The research was developed by Terrell Strayhorn and is not available in the public domain. The original survey was pilot tested on a small sample of institutions; feedback from the pilot study helped to clarify the survey items, correct the logical sequence, and determine the usefulness of the scoring algorithm. All rights to the survey belong to the author. All analyzes presented in this issue were performed by Strayhorn and Royel Johnson.

Promising sites were selected based on a comprehensive analysis of the results of an annual survey conducted among all NISOD institutional members. The score was calculated using an algorithm that takes into account weighted data for all points highlighted in the survey, such as the benefits of diversity, employee demographics and diversity policies (eg, bias monitoring, employee orientation). As the number of respondents to the annual survey grows each year, the algorithm adapts accordingly to the diversity of institutions included in the final aggregate. For example, the analysis is sensitive to the availability, presence and use of inclusive practices, staff support and diversity initiatives, rather than institution or staff size. For a full discussion of these methods, see previous versions of this report in Diverse.

Today’s community colleges are as diverse as the students they serve. There are more than 1,100 community colleges in the United States, educating more than 12 million students each year. Community colleges also employ thousands of employees who work in critical functional areas, including student affairs or support services. These dedicated professionals strive to make the institution warm and welcoming to all other staff and students so that they can optimally develop, grow, learn and thrive.

This year’s list of the most promising places to work in community colleges includes an impressive team of two-year institutions that specialize in equipping students to secure the promise of a bright future. Each of them has its own programs and initiatives that make it uniquely who it is. Promising Places is a national award that celebrates student workplaces that are vibrant, diverse, supportive and committed to staff work-life balance, professional development and inclusive excellence.

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In this issue of Diverse, we try to pull back the curtain, so to speak, so that others can see the good work going on at these institutions and learn from them to strengthen new or improve existing community college jobs. The MPPWCC provides institutional leaders with information that can be used to improve the work environment, boost morale, or continuously improve practices in the student affairs department. It also serves as a useful tool for employers, career services workers and job seekers across the country.

Here’s what we’ve heard from readers since Promising Places first launched in 2014:

“I literally organized my recent job search around promising places. I went to the Diverse: Issues In Higher Education website, found a list of recommended community colleges, studied salary, benefits, and all [emphasis added] forms of support… and then applied only to those schools that offered what I was looking for. ” -Martha, Director of Education, hired by MPPWCC’21

Best Universities For Social Work

“Part of our [community college] accreditation and institutional effectiveness strategy is to provide direct evidence of achievement of campus goals related to staff diversity, faculty support, and professional development. We have included our response to the Promise Places survey as well as a special issue in our mid-term follow-up [report]. It was great for improving the program.” – Sebastian, Institutional Research Specialist

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As the Top Places to Work in Community Colleges project evolves, we’re learning more about what different institutions are doing to increase faculty and staff diversity, to foster a sense of belonging among staff, and to equip student educators to work with students. Here is a set of “prospective procedures” held during each year of the study. Promising practice #1: Recognition of good work

Every year, we hear from community college faculty and staff about the importance of recognizing good work, especially those in leadership positions. Specifically, institutions recognized as places of greatest promise over the past few years have been known to hold formal ceremonies that recognize the significant contributions of various members of the staff community. Quite often, faculty and staff described this practice as a positive feature of the institutional culture that helped them and their colleagues retain them. In addition to institutional awards and ceremonies, many faculty and staff have noted that their campus leadership has nominated them for regional and national awards, honors, and recognition sponsored by professional associations. We encourage community college leaders to adopt similar practices or approaches to recognizing the good work of staff and members of the campus community, particularly in areas that affect DEIB and campus climate.

The stated mission of community colleges includes a clear focus on serving the needs of the local community. It is therefore not surprising that faculty and staff at institutions identified as the most promising places emphasized the importance of their institutions fulfilling this responsibility. Over the years, faculty and staff have consistently shared insights about their institution’s connections, services, and recognition for the communities in which they are located. Some institutions provide support to the local business community through rapid response, professional development, start-up incubation and on-the-job training to meet the needs of today’s labor market. Other institutions signal the importance of community engagement by having cabinet-level leadership in the area, such as a vice president for diversity or a dean for community impact. Recently recognized, MPPWCC and this year’s selected schools host Racial Justice Summits, featuring keynote presentations, panel discussions, and roundtable discussions that connect the community with the campus. We encourage all leaders of community colleges and their respective institutions to be true members of their local communities and to serve the needs of people on and off campus. Share more than just zip codes; to devise ways to share capital – human, fiscal, physical and most importantly intellectual.

Institutions that have emerged among our most promising places over the years have prioritized significant investment in the professional development of faculty and staff to better prepare them for leadership in the organization and the wider community. Faculty and staff at institutions recognized over the years as places of greatest promise have discussed at length the ways in which their institutions have committed to investing in their professional development. For example, at Montgomery County Community College, faculty and staff highlighted the Faculty Diversity Fellows program for junior minority faculty and the President’s Leadership Academy for staff members who are considered “emerging leaders” at the institution. Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) staff also report that resources have always been available to support their professional development on and off campus, including book clubs, conference attendance, staff groups, webinars, and campus leadership training seminars. Last year, we learned that Coastline Community College hosted a college-wide training session on equity thinking and two flexible days for all faculty on topics ranging from data visualization to equity. Interestingly, CCAC staff noted that the campus offers a number of electronic supports such as online diversity training, online courtesy courses, and online LYNDA closed captioning training. We encourage community college leaders to collectively invest in formal faculty and staff professional development activities by adopting the ideas outlined here and in previous editions of this report.

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In addition to these promising practices, we offer the following six recommendations for promoting diversity, achieving equity, and fostering inclusion in community colleges:

Our team gets asked this question all the time: Who is responsible for an institution that “wins” an MPPWCC award? The issue has been raised by board members, community college presidents, vice presidents, and in some cases senior student affairs officers

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